Cornfield Meet

Things collide here.

It’s a Mad, Mad, Madhatter World.

One of the things I love about reading Adam‘s ongoing series of music recollections is the sheer avalanche of quick-hit memories and images and emotions they trigger.

His latest entry, on  Cowboy Junkies’ “Sweet Jane,” for instance, includes this bit:

I remember discovering the The Trinity Session wasn’t their first album when I stumbled upon Whites Off Earth Now!! on vinyl at Madhatter Music Co. (another independent music store now gone) in downtown Bowling Green.

Now, it’s entirely possible that I knew Madhatter was gone, but the last time Adam and I visited our old college town, it was still there. According to its Myspace page -

Madhatter Music Co. was founded in 1988 by Billy Hanway and Ed Cratty. Its first customer was a madman by the name of Jim Cummer, who became manager and eventually bought the store. For 18 years, Madhatter has stood for good music, flying under the radar of a diseased popular culture, communing with fellow like-minded freaks and lifers, and rocking out at all costs.

In October 2006, PB Army drummer and local music journalist/heart patient Keith Bergman took the torch and attempted to lead Madhatter from its recalcitrant teenage years into the murky waters of young adulthood. Sadly, he’s packed his bags and inventory, never to return. The store is officially closed.

Now, I remember Billy Hanway. At least inasmuch as he was “that guy Billy” who owned Madhatter.

And while I’ve lost track of which CDs of mine may have come from Madhatter – They Might Be Giants Flood, I’m pretty sure is one, though -  I know for certain that I have two flawless LPs I got there when I still had my first stereo system, since it still included a turntable. One is Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon, which I have still never owned in any other format, and the other is The Police, Synchronicity, which I picked up to replace my cassette. I think I paid maybe three bucks each for these.

But what really socked me while reading that blurb was that Madhatter was founded in 1988, meaning that when we started our freshman year at BG in the fall of ’89, the store was only a year or so old. The thing is, it felt like the sort of place that had existed for decades, sandwiched in that dingy little building between bars and gas stations and alleys. Frankly, I figured Madhatter had in all likelihood, been there since the one year my Dad attended BG back in the late 1960s. I would have at least figured the place dated back to the ’70s, but man, I’m telling you: It felt like it could have.

I mean, if you’re what, older than 30, you know this kind of store. You walk in, and there’s a rack of local music rags and a wall that’s been tacked over with countless layers of band flyers and bar show announcements. And there’s one glass case layered with stuff like “Corporate Rock Sucks” patches and anarchy logo buttons and bumper stickers, and another case filled with CDs from Europe and rare reissues and B-side collections and concert bootlegs. The walls are covered in posters and lined with racks of CDs and LP records – and one sadly-neglected bin of cassette tapes is over in a corner – and you go in and start flipping through stuff that you’ve seen before, but maybe something new is out this week, or maybe someone traded in a collection you’re looking for.

Odds are the place smells like someone’s basement that you know – like an old couch and a candle and patchouli and a bit of mustiness that never quite congeals into “rank,” but still kind of encloses you a little bit claustrophobically. It’s not anything you’d call a pleasant smell, but recalling it, by association, puts me in a mood of remembering an important and special time in my life.

Suck it, iTunes. Bite me, Amazon. Yeah, you’re convenient and wondrous and I can’t live without you, but you’ll never be my Madhatter, you hear me?

Dammit.

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February 8, 2010 - Posted by | 1980s, eighties, Music, Ohio, writing | , , ,

4 Comments »

  1. Captured beautifully and I.am.sad. No more Madhatter – the world has itself gone mad by these kind of stores not being supported. Just for that, I may have to drag Stevo to Magnolia Thunderpussy and Singing Dog this weekend, just to peruse and keep them afloat a little longer.

    Open only a year in 1989, really? Wow.

    Comment by Jen | February 8, 2010 | Reply

    • You know what else I miss? Escaped. Fetal. Pigs. \m/

      Comment by jrbooth | February 8, 2010 | Reply

  2. Tip of the hat to SpinMore Records in Kent for being my Madhatter. Also to Mystery Train Records in Cambridge, MA for picking up where SpinMore left off.

    I think SpinMore is still open and still carries vinyl, FWIW.

    Comment by Kink | February 8, 2010 | Reply

  3. [...] song that comes into heavy rotation on my all-time favorites list, and I buy Document on tape at Madhatter Music Co. just for this song. Several years later, after my dad died, I got behind the wheel of the 1982 [...]

    Pingback by REM: Photographs on the dashboard, taken years ago. « Cornfield Meet | September 27, 2011 | Reply


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