Cornfield Meet

Things collide here.

Character building

I haven’t created a Dungeons & Dragons character since sixth, maybe seventh grade. And I sold my only D&D book – the Fiend Folio – more than a decade ago.

But last night, as the Cavaliers totally tanked against the Celtics, I muted the TV and hunched over our family room coffee table with a couple pencils, fresh character sheets, and my brand-new Player’s Handbook (thanks, guys who bought Collect All 21 on Saturday!).

My urge to try the game again has been growing over the past year, and my recent trip to PAX East and subsequent reading of Fantasy Freaks and Gaming Geeks fanned the flames. So when my friend Kato extended the invitation to take part in a small test-the-waters sort of adventure, I got a little bit psyched.

And then – oh, yes, then the all-but-unforeseeable occurred: Jenn expressed an interest in playing, too. Now, she’s a former theatre buff, so role-playing seems to me like something she always would have kind of been open to, but she was always just a little wary when I brought up the notion of hanging out with our friends and rolling d20s for a night.

I went out and picked up the Player’s Handbook on Sunday, surprised at the kind of retro-flashback thrill I got standing there at the gaming shelves and picking out my copy. Brought it home and perused it a bit, and then, after dinner, when I figured we were in for watching a recorded TV show or two, Jenn says, “Hey – I thought we were going to make our characters?”

In we dove: It was strange not using the dice-rolling method (Kato advised us that as beginners, we’re probably better served with a less random approach) to determine our ability scores, but again – penciling numbers in those spaces labeled STR, CON, DEX, INT, WIS and CHA … well, it just poked into some really, really super-dormant corners of my head in a completely enjoyable way.

We clumsily worked our way through the process of figuring in the bonuses for our races and classes (an Elven Cleric for Jenn, and me a Halfling Rogue) though with only one copy of the book, there was a lot of flipping back and forth and bookmarking with stickynotes. We wrote down our Hit Points and carefully logged our Defense Modifiers, and before we could finish, it was time to go pick up our daughter from her weekend trip, so we closed up shop for the night. Monday, then, I picked up where I’d left off, and I think I’m mostly finished. My character still lacks a name, though he’s got a sketched-out backstory in my head, and the plan is for us to send our creations to Kato to see if we’ve managed to come up with adventurers suitable for the quest ahead.

I don’t know who else will be there – Kato’s fiancee for sure, maybe some other mutual friends, possibly even my daughter, who admitted she doesn’t know what D&D is, but she’s “read that Wil Wheaton book twice and it sounds like fun.”

There’s now a date on my calendar – not too far off! – blank except for one notation in black pen: “D+D.”

Can you hear the dice?

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May 4, 2010 - Posted by | 1980s, eighties, Games, geek, Ohio | , , , , , ,

3 Comments »

  1. […] morning, I got up and wrote it down as part of the backstory for the Dungeons & Dragons character I’m creating, and doing that – just sitting at the keyboard and making something up – was something […]

    Pingback by A story in the middle of the night « Cornfield Meet | May 11, 2010 | Reply

  2. […] I returned for real to Dungeons & Dragons on Saturday, Jenn played for the first time ever, and our daughter may join the party next time […]

    Pingback by In Which the Adventure Begins Anew « Cornfield Meet | May 24, 2010 | Reply

  3. […] created a character, found myself half-dreaming scenes from his family history, got excited about buying dice, and […]

    Pingback by Dungeons and Dragons and Family and Friends « Cornfield Meet | July 29, 2010 | Reply


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