Cornfield Meet

Things collide here.

Looking back at Gen Con 2015

Gen Con 2015 is now almost seven weeks in my rear-view mirror. Besides all the new-to-me games played over the four days in Indianapolis, there were several other personal firsts on this, my third trip to the convention: First time driving down Wednesday afternoon rather than Thursday morning; first time attending the Diana Jones Award presentation; first time meeting fellow GeekDads James Floyd Kelly and Gerry Tolbert (and several other very cool non-GeekDad folks); and first time running an RPG! (That’s going to get its own post.)

Fantastic – as always – gaming and geeking out with Jonathan Liu and Dave Banks; and also with Brian Stillman, who got in touch with me several years ago for Plastic Galaxy and was making his first trip to Gen Con.

Seventeen games played (sixteen uniques) and twelve first-times during my 90-some hours in Indianapolis. I also came home with a game to review: Munchkin Gloom.

Here’s a bit from my contribution to the “Our Most Favorite Things About Gen Con, 2015 Edition” post at GeekDad:

Three Gen Cons in, it has become very clear where my core time-balancing struggle lies: I absolutely love the free hours (often late) spent at the table with fellow GeekDads and friends, playing new game after new game after new game. That said, with each passing summer trip to Indianapolis, I’ve spent more time sitting down with dice and pencils and character sheets for role-playing adventures.

I did three organized RPGs this year:

After last year’s first visit to the Ninth World in Monte Cook Games’ Numenera, I returned this year for another ticketed small-group adventure, “The Hideous Game.” GM Ryan Chaddock led our party through an increasingly creepy mystery and a fun climactic face-off (for real: someone’s face came off. Numenera’s weird.), and the four-hour session zipped by. It also added to my knowledge and appreciation of the Cypher System developed for the game, which came in handy less than 48 hours later, on day three of Gen Con, when, for the first time, I sat in the GM chair and ran an adventure.

I also tried out Monte Cook’s second Cypher System game, The Strange, which is set in the modern world, with the core premise that the collected myths, legends, and fiction of humanity have spawned small pocket dimensions called “recursions.” This means adventures can take place in pretty much any setting imaginable, and bizarre stuff is way more likely than not. The adventure we played was called “Mastodon,” and there were velociraptors and cyborgs and something called a Wonder Gun, I think. Our GM, Dan Guderian, had a nice flair for cinematic storytelling that was put to good use in our final showdown. There’s definitely a Numenera flavor to The Strange, not just in the game system, but in the use of one-shot odd items called cyphers, and the chaotic undercurrent that means what’s behind that next door is probably never what you’re thinking.

After playing one-hour Dungeons & Dragons sessions my first two Gen Cons, we went for one of the three-hour D&D Epic adventures this time. After a bit of a rushed, confusing party muster just prior to game time, our party of seven settled in for “Mulmaster Undone.” As part of this year’s D&D Adventurers League events, this meant that as we took our place amidst dozens of other tables and parties, we were a small part of a large, single story event, and our table’s success (or failure) contributed to the overall story arc for the entire group. We had a fun mix of players and characters, levels one through three, and despite losing a quarter of my hit points in literally the first two minutes of the game – which is what happens when you’re a first-level deep gnome rogue facing a panicked stampede and YOU ROLL A ONE – I survived to the end of the night and had a ton of fun bringing down some nasty Elemental Evil cultists. Full credit to our dungeon master Ashley Oswald for keeping things moving and ensuring everyone at the table got to contribute significantly to the play. Her enthusiasm was contagious.

Add those three sessions to the three-hour adventure I GMed, and all told, I spent about 15 hours of my Gen Con playing or prepping for RPGs. I’m not sure how much more I could squeeze in without feeling like I was missing out on other things I love to do. 

Here’s my game run-down. Asterisks denote games I played for the first time:

King’s Gold*

First game of #GenCon2015 with some fellow @geekdads: King's Gold!

A post shared by John Booth (@jbooth70) on

 

Worst Game Ever*

#GenCon2015: @geekdads play the Worst Game Ever.

A post shared by John Booth (@jbooth70) on

 

Mysterium* (Mentioned by Dave Banks in this GeekDad post, and one of my favorite tabletop games of the con.)

Last night: @geekdads gaming late, playing Mysterium.

A post shared by John Booth (@jbooth70) on

 

Camel Up* (Another of my Gen Con favorites.)

Also from late Thursday night: Camel Up – racing; gambling; fun. #GenCon2015

A post shared by John Booth (@jbooth70) on

 

Dungeons & Dragons

#DnD at #GenCon2015 : Nothing like rolling the dice with a few hundred fellow adventurers.

A post shared by John Booth (@jbooth70) on

 

Numenera (twice – one as a player, one as a GM)

IMG_20150730_112006_425

 

The Game*

IMG_20150730_182853_774

 

Apocalypse Chaos*

IMG_20150731_111417_869

 

Warehouse 51*

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Roll For It

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Smash Up Munchkin*

IMG_20150731_212831_969

 

Codenames* (Also a personal favorite.)

IMG_20150801_242432_864

 

Riftwalker* (prototype – mentioned in Jonathan’s post here.)

The Strange*

Dead Man’s Draw*

True Dungeon

There was also walking the exhibit hall, marveling at cosplay, enjoying good food and a few beers, catching up with great people I don’t get to see often enough, and all the stuff that makes this particular convention so physically exhausting and mentally energizing.

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September 17, 2015 - Posted by | Games, geek, Travel | , ,

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